Documentary: Miss Representation

For an online course I am taking this summer, I was assigned to watch the documentary Miss Representation and write a 1-page analysis. I watched this motion picture and had some A+ feelings (literally, I got 100% haha!) I’m happy and it fits with my blog content, so I’ve shared it below. Read and get educated!

 
MISS REPRESENTATION  MISREPRESENTATION
 

Miss Representation is a documentary highlighting the startling and depressing reality of women portrayal in the media. Women around the world, often identified as “feminists” have long fought for complete equality in a patriarchal society. Impressive improvement has been made, however, in 2016, I believe we still remain victims of misrepresentation. This message was made immediately clear when I was bombarded with over-sexualized images of females in the media: Jessica Simpson, splaying over a soapy car in a string bikini; a faceless female thrusting her pelvis upward while a rapper slowly drops cash between her legs.

“You can’t be what you can’t see” is the key focus of this film, which I confirm broadcasts the idea that girls growing with this crude content cannot becoming successful and empowered if women who embody these traits are not modeled in the media. The media is a molder of minds who undeniably influences not only what we think about, but how we think about it. Since the birth of media circulation, the intelligence, integrity and overall worth of women have been limited under the suffocating weight of oppression.

Degrading mass messages continued to spread through generations of young women, infecting their self-esteem, which contributes to the staggering 65% of females who suffer from an eating disorder. This truth is highlighted in the documentary when young women openly confess to the damage that the media has done to their self-worth. I distinctly remember the moment I allowed the media to poison my self-perspective as a young, vulnerable girl. At twenty-two, the harm transformed itself into an eating disorder I spent the last year battling.

The undermining of women in advertising, entertainment, and politics is an unwavering flaw that has become ingrained as a societal norm. The media’s treatment of women denies them the power of self. The media does a dreadful job at defining who I am; as a strong, capable woman with intellect, I believe it is my responsibility to help rewrite this definition.

Laurie Hamame

Ball of sunshine. Chronic giggler. A lover of all things sweet potato. An overly friendly, world traveling, body positive warrior. Avid bookworm. Self-proclaimed chef and spiritually Italian. Promotor of daily walks, coffee dates and 30-second dance parties.

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Laurie Hamame

Ball of sunshine. Chronic giggler. A lover of all things sweet potato. An overly friendly, world traveling, body positive warrior. Avid bookworm. Self-proclaimed chef and spiritually Italian. Promotor of daily walks, coffee dates and 30-second dance parties.

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